Friday, February 27, 2015

Musicians,What Is Your Favorite Album? And Do You Learn From It Or Just Listen---If You're smart You'll Learn And Be Able To Play To It

Hey Players,

I guess I should have said what is one of your favorite alums of all time?

I've never had an album I felt was the best or my favorite.

But if you have one you've really respected and admired for their musicianship; As far as the playing,vocals and ability of the band to gel like they've been playing for a 100 years, what album might that be.

That album for me is the 1978 Rush (Hemispheres) album. It's one of the better progressive rock albums of the late 70's. It's like a blend of theater as far as Geddy Lee's vocals and the ability of Alex and Neal to mesh their riffs like they're acting out a play that's very dramatic, and take us on a journey of prog rock you never want to end. As well, their ability to take their instruments to levels most bands never achieve.

And yes, the odd metered timing and recording songs like Circumstance---my favorite from the album and La Villa Strangiato which have stood the test of time and not end up on FM Rock and Classic Rock radio in rotation, thank god.

Those two songs make players think how to compose music on a level that makes players play different chord structures without constant virtuoso soloing too. This is an album you want to go and buy the old record album of, even if it costs you 40 bucks. It's a learning tool like no other. Use it to play to---and if you're a blues/rock player, you'll learn to take blues numbers on a ride as well.

But for now, grab a hold of this album from the link below. Or if I have it above this just click and listen and learn guys. I love this shit and I think the best learning tools are ones you listen to and play to.

Now,get busy and make me proud and be able to play one of the songs off Hemispheres.

Yeahhh!!

Friday, February 20, 2015

Jimi Hendrix On Tape Before He Started The Experience Will Be Available Soon! Eddie Kramer Says So!

Eddie Kramer definitely has his finger on the pulse of music still, and many bands, not just one's from the 60's and 70's still flock to him for recording advice, and literally want him to record their bands. As well, Eddie just said some old recordings of Jimmy with Curtis Knight---before he started The Experience will be available very soon, so stay tuned Hendrix fans. I'll be interested to know how Hendrix played on these sessions for Curtis Knight, and how much of his own style he was allowed to inject into these mixes. It'll be an interesting listen. I'll notify once they do become available. Until then, keep playing great music players!

I'll keep you posted as to when these recordings will be available. 


Musicians, like I always say think of any recordings of today or 40 or 50 years back as a learning tool. Either to use in your arsenal, or to help out a musician you know.

I'm looking forward to hearing Jimmy being a sideman and what he added to their sound back about 1965 if I'm correct.

I'll get back to ya' when Eddie says so. I'll even leave you a link to Eddie Kramer's facebook page. It's a treasure trove of pictures and little tips your band can use in the studio and live. There's always something to learn being a musician guys. 

https://www.facebook.com/EddieKramerProducer


Tuesday, February 17, 2015

Why You Should Be Grabbing The Jimmy Page Book And Succeeding As A Musician--Or Making A Poutine Sandwich

Musicians, and music fans, I'm just blown away by the great tips from this book on Jimmy Page written by Guitar World Editor in-Chief Brad Tolinski. Brad has had the great opportunity for many years to interview Jimmy at length for articles in GW. What has always fascinated me about Page is not all the great music he produced for Zeppelin, but how he recorded it, and how he has helped other bands in the studio over the years create their own style tone wise. The book is called: " Light And Shade" Conversations With Jimmy Page. I think this book is worth many thousands of dollars if you're a musician who sees the incredibly valuable tips from Jimmy, and actually use them to help your band in the studio and doing live or session work for yourself or your band. I know this stuff seems so simple, but most musicians just read and consume books on famous musicians, but never use those tips to help their bands, or others.

I want you to succeed, massively!! And yes, I'm selling the book which I still think is worth a fortune. Its like having the keys to the kingdom in your hot little hands. So, get started on the road to better life as a musician by grabbing a copy of this book, for your band members. I'll be also giving away a small number of copies of the book as well. Don't let this great opportunity pass you by guys. I want the best for you. So, click the link below to get started. As well, I'll have some tips from the book on future posts here on the blog, which is totally free. And you should be reading that material which can help your band become the musicians I know you will be.

http://www.amazon.com/Light-Shade-Conversations-Jimmy-Page/dp/030798575X/ref=as_sl_pc_qf_sp_asin_til?tag=canadiangui08-20&linkCode=w00&linkId=RJFA5M7OM4BBN5OJ&creativeASIN=030798575Xhttp://

Friday, February 13, 2015

Errick Lewis One of The Best Bass Jazz Lads Out There Gives Me His Take On A Tone QuestionMusicians, What Do You Do To Get Great Tone? Amp? Axe? Stompbox? Mic setup? What Is It?

I asked the well known Portland Oregon Bass Player Errick Lewis a question on how he gets the great tone in his onstage and album material. I want to go more into this later with other artists as well. So, you other musicians out there I ask the same question, how you get the tone you play. Is it from a certain combo of your amp and guitar set up, or is it those things and a few tweaks of a stompbox to add to the mix? What is it? I really want to know. I'll include some of your answers up on the blog Canadian Guitar Player as well. But check out Errick lewis and The Vibe Project in Portland Oregon. You want to listen to sweet players who know they're stuff, go out to one of their gigs or jams. You won't be sorry you did.
Here is Errick's answer.

Hey Errick, just send me a couple tunes when you get a chance. Question for you though. As far as gear goes, what do you think gear wise has the most impact on getting your own tone? Wow that's a good question because it all plays a major role from the and the electronics in the base all the way down to the woods at the cab is made out of The types of cables you use matter the power supply you use matters there's so many elements it's not just the axe is everything at least to me

Hey Errick. Thank you. I think I was looking at something in the book about Jimmy Page I'm reading right now, and I thought of asking you. So, I'll put that up on the blog and here on FB.

For more info on Eric Lewis and The Vibe Project--Go to: www.erricklewis.com

Sunday, February 8, 2015

Eddie Kramer Demos New F-Pedals The Phazevibe And Edstortion---With Golden Nuggets Of Information To Tweak Your Tone Just Right

Musicians and Jimi Hendrix lovers, Eddie Kramer had the
great privilege of recording the 60's and 70's top bands. Eddie was at the NAMM show in Anaheim this year. If you don't know what NAMM is, its the biggest music industry show for companies that make music equipment from guitars to amps to effects,recording equipment,live equipment you name it! Eddie has recently come out with his own line of pedals.
I'm not sure if they're from Harmony Central or what. But Eddie and a player at NAMM were demoing 2 CF pedals. One a Phazevibe, and the other a Edstortion. Obviously the phazevibe is like a phase pedal, and I especially like the Edstortion, which is like a Fulltone Univibe which Robin Trower is well known for using.
The Edstortion gives off a great overdriven tone that combines both a cleaner tone and a high quality crunch, which you don't get from a lot of distortion pedals. That tells you something right there fellow pedal junkies. Watch the master Eddie Kramer at work tweaking and combining both pedals together which are golden nuggets of info you can use to tweak your pedals, or if you buy one of these bad boys.
http://youtu.be/Z6I7eUlRWjg
You're literally watching Eddie's hands tweak and grab that old vintage pedal tone--Fuzz Distortion and cleaner phase tone. And yes, if they're available online I'll have someone demo them, and I'll be selling em.' If I can, and I don't know if I could pull it off, I'd love to actually interview Eddie. You want to learn to record and use your pedals right, watch what Eddie does. He has a Facebook page just loaded with little recording tips guys, and pics of him with a lot of the bands he recorded. They are worth a lot of money these tips. Don't cha' think? Watch Eddie at NAMM herMusicians and Jimi Hendrix lovers, Eddie Kramer had the great privilege of recording the 60's and 70's top bands. Eddie was at the NAMM show in Anaheim this year. If you don't know what NAMM is, its the biggest music industry show for companies that make music equipment from guitars to amps to effects,recording equipment,live equipment you name it! Eddie has recently come out with his own line of pedals.
I'm not sure if they're from Harmony Central or what. But Eddie and a player at NAMM were demoing 2 CF pedals. One a Phazevibe, and the other a Edstortion. Obviously the phazevibe is like a phase pedal, and I especially like the Edstortion, which is like a Fulltone Univibe which Robin Trower is well known for using.
The Edstortion gives off a great overdriven tone that combines both a cleaner tone and a high quality crunch, which you don't get from a lot of distortion pedals. That tells you something right there fellow pedal junkies. Watch the master Eddie Kramer at work tweaking and combining both pedals together which are golden nuggets of info you can use to tweak your pedals, or if you buy one of these bad boys.

You're literally watching Eddie's hands tweak and grab that old vintage pedal tone--Fuzz Distortion and cleaner phase tone. And yes, if they're available online I'll have someone demo them, and I'll be selling em.' If I can, and I don't know if I could pull it off, I'd love to actually interview Eddie. You want to learn to record and use your pedals right, watch what Eddie does. He has a Facebook page just loaded with little recording tips guys, and pics of him with a lot of the bands he recorded. They are worth a lot of money these tips. Don't cha' think? Watch Eddie at NAMM here.

 

Thursday, February 5, 2015

Portland Bass Player Errick Lewis Doles Out Golden Nuggets On Being A Great Session Player, And Helping Fellow MusiciansTake Your Music To new Height




This is an important repost of an influential player who I will be featuring again very soon. I hope to create value for musicians with this interview. Errick has sessioned with many top players and helps musicians immensely.


Errick is known as a Bass Axeman with a focus on being a session player's session player. Errick has been in the music game a short time in 12 to 13 years, yet has made an impact most Bass players would love to have been a part of.

His focus has been mainly on hip-hop and gospel based music recently, and has earned the opportunity to do sessions and tour work with some of the game's more well known artists such as Snoop Dogg,Lauryn Hill and tour and production sessions with Jay-Z. Errick seems to be able to challenge himself without knowing the material and capitalizing on that by just killing it!

If that's not enough, EL has his own indie-solo gig (Eric Lewis and the Vibe Project) in which he writes and plays all tracks. These tracks are a good mix of jazz with a funk and soul groove all EL's own.

http://www.myspace.com/truth_bass This is Errick's site with all sorts of material on his career as a bottom feeder and his production company.

So I asked Errick one question on Session work and what he does when going in.

MG: When you set up for a session regardless if it's a whole album or one track, is the combo of proper equipment set up and learning the material beforehand more important than just going in "cold" and getting the feel for the material?

Kind of like doing cold readings in a play or film?

EL: Yeah Mark, it's a combination of both and it's good to learn the tracks, but the setup is more important because 90% of the time I don't get the music until I get in the studio. What I normally do is bring my rig to all sessions and I use an Epifani 902c amp to stay in the groove and pocket and in a signature tone all my own as part of the artist's package in a session.

EL is also doing a lot of work as a producer and assisting musicians who are just developing their story and act. And like I said before, Errick is an accomplished bottom feeder/producer who has been in music a short time.

As well has been recognized by everyone from music equipment companies like Epifani and D'addario to top Bass players like G Rock from Detroit's Gorilla Funk Mob, one of the east coast's top backing bands around.


Another thing I'm finding with Errick as well is his attention to and importance he places on helping other musicians as a producer,teacher and showing them the importance of using marketing on-line and off-line to use as a tool to help develop a fan base and their careers. Like I keep saying to musicians, look for off the beaten ways to market and make money.

Errick does this and more while a lot of blues and rock guys don't understand it or feel the need for it. Just a little rant there. This outsider knows how to market like a ninja bottom-feeder and keeps on thumpin' away.

Errick's Bottom-Feeder Rig:

I will have Eric's guitar,amp,strings and effects lineup in a day or so. So if you want to learn from a real Ninja Bass Warrior teacher on your bottom feeding rig and tunes, look no further than EL himself.

Here's EL's rig that he cuts those amazing Bottom-Feeder Thumps and grooves on:


Bass Axe: 6 String Pavel Bass
5 String MTD Jazz Bass
Amp: Epifani 902c
Cab: 2 Epifani PS-410 Cabinets


Look for further articles on Errick soon and look at his site at:

http://www.myspace.com/truth_bass


or email Errick at: erricklewis@gmail.com

Monday, February 2, 2015

Do You Think Recording And Playing Tips From Jimmy Page Are Worth A Million Dollars?

Are the Jimmy Page tips I'm giving you helping you play better, and record better? As far as what Jimmy's tips are worth to musicians is debatable, I think they are at least worth in the mid six figures. meaning half a million smackers guys. I'm not kidding! Back to Jimmy Page now. 
It's going to take me a long time to read the book on Jimmy if I keep taking notes of every tip musicians like yourself can use. But to me it's worth it to give you the musician valuable tips you can use on stage, in the studio and in your music business.   So, I'll keep the trend continuing. Yeah, I might be violating copyright of the book, by giving you these tips. Don't know. Let's find out together. 
I know this is simple stuff to musicians like yourself, but most musicians won't use these tips and they'll get hung up on certain aspects of the tips I've putting out there. I want you to take action on these tips guys. I want you to succeed, big time! 
So, I'm going to give you a tip from Jimmy on mike placement. Think about it, do you keep your mic's placed close to your instruments and just getting a far away or distant sound or tone? That's what Jimmy was getting when he was producing in the 60's before he started Zeppelin. He was recording a drummer, can't remember his name. But he would keep the mic right close to his kit there by getting a very small sound taking away from the bass and rhythm foundation of the recording. So, what Jimmy did was move the mic farther away to get a more ambient sound that gathered the acoustics of the room, and the guitar and bass that much better.
But here's a tip on mic placement from little old me. When doing proper mic placement, always test,test, test! So use this little mike placement tip guys. This is very unsexy stuff, but I personally think if you use these tips, your recordings and playing will be that much better. And, I personally think Jimmy's tips from this book are worth many thousands of dollars, and I'm giving it away for free. I hope this tip helps guys.
Much success in the studio and live gigs!